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20110301
20110331
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CSPAN2 12
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English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2011 8:00pm EST
as an acting solicitor general in the mid-90s. he argued nine cases before the u.s. supreme court. the most by a solicitor general in more than 20 years. we also have ted olson who is a partner in gibson, done and crunchers from the washington d.c. office a member of the firm's executive committee and cochair of the appellate and constitutional law group. a former solicitor general of the united states, ted is one of the nation's premier appellate and u.s. supreme court advocates and he is argued dozens of cases before the court and i might add that both of them have contributed to north carolina victories in the u.s. supreme court and i thank them for that. the national association of attorney general is fortunate to have dan schweitzer is her supreme court counsel. his principle and very important responsibility to assist state appellate litigators who appear before the united states supreme court and he excels at his job. my thanks to all three of you for your time and for your expertise and i will turn it over to you. >> thank you general cooper. it is a pleasure and honor to be here to
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2011 9:00am EDT
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2011 12:00pm EDT
, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we were to detect anything, we may detect things well below any levels that require action. we did
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2011 11:00pm EST
in the president's 129,000,002,012 budget for the u.s. the board of transportation designed as a first installment of the bold six year 556 billion reauthorization proposal the lowest relative level of domestic spending since president eisenhower was in office six decades ago. that was ten administrations ago. the simple fact is we have to cut and consolidate things that aren't growing the economy or making easier, making it easier to do business in order to pay for the things that are so the department of transportation, president obama's budget slashes red tape and consolidates more than 50 programs and includes reforms that will accelerate project delivery and in power local communities. of course our major of objective is to make investments and to mauro that expand economic opportunities today. to dream big and build big hit on the cover of the budget, there is a picture of a bridge that crosses the hoover dam, connect nevada and arizona. seven years ago or more people began planning for this bridge. and if it weren't for the big thinkers and the big builders of generations ago, we wouldn't h
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2011 12:00pm EST
concludes this article with the statement that the u.s. does not have an energy problem, it has an energy strategy problem. think about that. it's not lacking the resources. it's the strategy for how we develop our energy resources. during his campaign, president obama liked to quote dr. martin luther king, and he talked about the fierce urgency of now. and there are few issues more important or more fundamental to our nation's long-term success than a viable energy policy. people are very correct when they say that parts of this will -- will take time. parts of it will take a longer period of time, but now is nevermore fiercely urgent than when we have such an important and such a long journey ahead of us. if we're ever going to take control of our energy future, now is the time to get -- to come together, support the policies that promote abundant, affordable, clean, diverse and domestic energy. critically important to us, madam president, and i look forward to these conversations that will continue on the floor as we talk about ways that we not only work to reduce our budget, ways that
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2011 12:00pm EST
undermine what is the creative opportunity for the u.s. economy. it is in invention, and we want thousands and thousands and thousands of inventors, not just inventors that work for big corporations, thousands of inventors who have their rights. so i support the feinstein amendment, and i thank the president, and i yield the floor. mrs. feinstein: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: thank you, madam president. i want to thank the senator from washington for her comments. we welcome her support, and i was pleased to be able to listen to these comments. what is the current status of the time allocation? the presiding officer: the proponents have 3 1/2 minutes remaining, and the opponents have ten minutes remaining. mrs. feinstein: i would ask unanimous consent that our 3 1/2 minutes be extended so that senator risch who will speak next has the time that he requires and i have the time for a brief close. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. mr. risch: thank you, madam president, fellow senators. i'm pro
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 12:00pm EDT
request for the u.s. gs is one of those where i wish we could have someone from the white house come up and place a hand on the bible and raise his or her right hand and explain themselves because this is a budget that has four things by cutting $89 million and 230fde's from core science programs this budget runs counter to the president's commitment to restore science to its rightful place. second by proposing a washington monument-type cuts to programs like endocrine stream gauges, you see how i said that that the american people care about the budget shows that this administration is willing to play games with this congress by testing our resolve during these serious fiscal times third by inheriting the full funding responsibilities for lancet 9 and 10 from nasa without any of nasa's $19 billion budget and by offsetting the $48 million increase for lancet from other core science programs this budget is assigned of the untenable situation we're likely to be in two years from now when the administration sends up a budget request for lancet that is nearly 10 times the increased proposed
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 12:00pm EST
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
CSPAN
Mar 8, 2011 5:00pm EST
inherited the largest deficits in u.s. history. he joined with democrats here in congress to join a balanced deficit reduction law that resulted in the largest surpluses in history and put us on a path by the year 2000 to completely eliminate the national debt within a decade. i was here then. every single republican voted against it. every single one. likewise today president obama inherited from president a deficit in excess of, are you ready for this on one -- $1 trillion. and a deep recession that made it even worse. once again, we democrats are committed to bringing this under control and to do it in a fair and balanced way. but, as a former president once said, here we go again. in december, my friends on the other side of the aisle, the republicans insisted we extend tax cuts largely benefiting the wealthy. as $354 to the deficit this year, even more next year, then they voted to repeal the health reform bill, which would ad add $210 to the deficit, and now these same people are shedding crocodile tears an claim to be worried about the deficit. let's be clear, there's a right way to b
CSPAN
Mar 15, 2011 5:00pm EDT
senator, dan coates diverred his first speech to the senate floor talking about the u.s. economy and budget cuts. this is 25 minutes. >> mr. president, returning to the senate is like in many ways having a chance to relive a part of your life, and yet doing so with a benefit of experience, the experience i gained in serving in this body before and also service from the private sector, and it allows you to see things differently than you saw them before, and while i've discussed with my colleagues what is the same here in the senate on return, there's also much that has changed in our country and that i think will mandate change in this institution. it's what has changed that has brought me back to the senate because the more that i witnessed what happens to our country, the more i realized, i, like many others across the country, need to reengage in the country and return to the time-tested principle, not to the least of which is returning our federal government to one that ensures a healthy, fiscal nation whose finances and policies promote job opportunities for its citizens. i
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 9:00am EST
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2011 12:00am EST
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12